Moonlight Mondays(Interview #7)

 

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One of the interesting things about indie authors is that working on publicity never ends. I’ll bet you know exactly what I mean.

My latest interview is with idleskybps.com  via Moonlight Mondays(Interview #7)

It’s always fun to read an interview over a while after I’ve written responses, and I’d love to have you take a look and leave a comment, reblog, and/or like.

Please keep writing. It will make a HUGE difference in your life.

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Gotta get the word out!

How hard is it to tell the world about your book?

Not too hard.

It’s getting them to listen that’s the trick. 

 

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Speaking with a customer at the Dublin Library in Dublin, CA.

Saturday I shared books with other local writers at the Dublin (CA) Library, and even sold some.

Today my interview with Kaye Lynn Booth is out.

via Interview with author B. Lynn Goodwin

Take a look, leave a reply, and let me know if you’d like to interview me for your blog.

BTW, it’s never too late to pick up a copy of NEVER TOO LATE: From Wannabe to Wife at 62. 

Also available wherever books are sold. Just tell them to order from Ingram. 

R & Me

A delightful read that will teach you much about the process of discerning what is right for you.”    ~~Linda Marshall, author of A Long Awakening to Grace

Instead of continuing to search for a mate who is a mirror of ourselves, who is the most intelligent, wealthy, successful, witty, etc., embrace the person who is authentic and trustworthy, with styles or attributes that we lack, who brings out the best in us.” ~~L. Kain 

 

 

 

 

Never Too Late Featured at Book Fair

My book was published far from California, where I live. The company, Koehler Books, is in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and my editor, Lynn Moon, pictured below, displayed top books, promoted the company, and answered the questions of those who’d like to publish with Koehler.

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What does it matter?

One of the books she brought was mine. It’s the blue one on the far right side of the table. You can read Never Too Late on it.

She sent me that picture and this one:

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It’s really hard to miss the book in that one.

She said there was a lot of interest in the book and she sent lots of people to Amazon People can get there as soon as they are sent, if they have a cell phone, and who doesn’t these days? 

So my Amazon numbers were up.

You can keep them that way. Buy a copy for a friend, for a library, for a relative, for a group, or for your book club to look at. I’m happy to talk by phone with any book club, writing group, service organization, singles group, or Meet-Up group. There are face-to-face methods as well, and I’m happy to talk to you about it. 

Please help me share my story with any group you are in. You can tell me how below.

A Character Talks To Her Author

Talent
Pick up a copy of Talent here

SM: This may sound a little strange, but I’m going to interview my author, B. Lynn Goodwin about the book she wrote before mine.

You see I’ve been learning a few things about care giving since I met a girl named Tessa. You’ll meet her when you read Talent. Her sister came back from Afghanistan with some kind of a brain injury. She’s still in a coma, but Tessa’s keeping a journal for her to help her when she wakes up. So, Lynn, my first question would be is Tessa’s journal like your book?

BLG: A little bit. In both cases caregivers are relieving stress by writing their stories one incident at a time and one feeling at a time.

They are processing their thoughts as they write them down. There’s something about slowing down and putting pen to paper or fingers to keyboard that makes what’s happening more manageable. You don’t deny thoughts the minute they flit into your brain. Instead you deal with them.

SM: Cool. That’s like my journal for English class, except I try not to say anything too personal there.

BLG: You can be as personal as you want when you journal for yourself. So who else would this journal be good for?

SM: Maybe my mom. Maybe even my dad. They can’t get over what happened to my brother, Bri. Not that I blame them. But it totally sucks—I mean it’s totally hard—to be me right now. They hardly even know I’m around.

BLG: So they could process what happened to Bri and how they are coping?

SM: Wait a minute. I’m supposed to be asking the questions! Do you have to journal every day?

BLG: Write when you want to. Write as often as you want to. Some people set a timer for 10 minutes. Some people keep going long after 10 minutes.

SM: Where did those 200 sentence starts come from?

BLG: Good questions, Sandee. I’m not sure anyone ever asked me that before. I first wrote them for my students. They were tenth graders who kept saying, “There’s nothing to write about.” So I started saying, “Finish that sentence start on the board and just keep going.”

SM: Did it work?

BLG: Would it work in your English class?

SM: It would for some people.

BLG: Exactly. When I used sentence starts with more motivated people, like drama students developing their characters or my free writing group, people used them to start. They let one idea lead to the next.

SM: So are journaling and free writing the same?

BLG: Free writing is a form of journaling.

SM: So I think I might like a copy of the book for Tessa, and I think I should get Mom and Dad separate books. So how do I get it?

BLG: Go to Amazon. I know you know about Amazon because they sell your story, Talent too. The Amazon page for You Want Me to Do WHAT? Journaling for Caregivers is You Want Me to Do WHAT? The page for Talent is Talent.

SM: Thanks for letting me interview you. Maybe I should take up journalism.

BLG: It’s okay with me, but you’ll have to wait until I get my newest book published before I can tell more of your stories, Sandee. I’ll tell you more about that book in our next interview.

Goodwin
Writer Advice