Dear Sandee

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Long ago you kept a diary. Do you remember? That’s how you first got noticed. It wound up being a series called “Dear Diary” which ran in Dramatics Magazine. It was probably a launching pad for Talent.

 

Now that you are more mature, I want to encourage you to keep a journal. I know your English teacher has suggested the same thing. Hers was for extra credit, I believe. This one can tag on to that. It’s for personal enlightenment. Write about what you are feeling and thinking. Write about what you believe. Write your wishes and hopes and even your fears if you want to.

 

Not sure how to start? Start with what happens today. Things come up. You might also start with this article full of suggestions for keeping a journal. I’ve shared it with the women on Story Circle Network, and I’d like you to have your own copy. So Many Benefits from Journaling That link should take you right to the article on Story Circle Network. Write back and let me know what you think, okay?

What an Almost 16-Year-Old Thinks

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Coming Out From Behind the Curtain

Dear Parents, Teachers, and Other Authorities,

The summer of 2016 has been something else. I like the movies and some of the music. I hate the news. I feel sorry for adults sometimes. You have so much to think about. So while I was practicing driving with Dad, I thought of a few hints that might help you get along with us. Many of you already do, of course. But not all. And not all the time. So read my list. It just might help.

  1. Listen to us. You’re doing that right now. But listen even when you’re mad, okay? We know we’re not perfect (except for Rob) and we want you to understand why we do the things we do.
  2. Don’t always play the teacher—even if you are the teacher. Sometimes we can teach you things.
  3. Ask questions—but not too many—and if we don’t want to answer back off.
  4. Respect our privacy. You wouldn’t want us diving into your drawers, your computer, your cell.
  5. Respect our rights. Mom & Dad have gotten really good at this, because they’ve talked about rights. I have the right to talk, but not to talk back. They will let me keep going out as long as I respect curfew. Things like that.

Question: What advice would you give parents, teachers, and other authorities? Please write back and tell me, whether you are a teen, a tween, a parent, a teacher, an authority, or an interested adult.

Thanks for reading, responding, and sharing. =)

Sandee Mason

You can purchase TALENT on Amazon at https://www.amazon.com/Talent-B-Lynn-Goodwin/dp/1629293350/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450916910&sr=8-1&keywords=9781629293356 (cut and paste)

You can forward this blog to friends, teachers, parents, and librarians.

Comments? Click on the link above to share them. =)

 

One of the Big Ones

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The San Jose Mercury News is one of the big regional newspapers in California. I remember reading it when I was a little girl, before the term Silicon Valley was coined, back in the day when we had one TV with no remote, in a console, in the family room. The Mercury-News has endured, and I hope that TALENT, which was reviewed there last week, will also endure.

This review, by Joanna Kraus, appeared in a column entitled “Summer Reading is Fun for All.” Here is what she said:

“Talent” by B. Lynn Goodwin (Danville) (Eternal Press, $12.50, ages 13-16.) Sandee’s brother has been missing in Afghanistan for seven months. Yet she hears Bri’s voice encouraging her when she auditions for the school musical, advising her when she selects a possible boyfriend, and supporting her when she must disobey the law to rescue a friend. She discovers “real life doesn’t have a script” in this moving novel, set in the East Bay. Sandee shows initiative, responsibility and finally the will to live her own life.

I liked her accuracy, her originality, and her choices of what will appeal to teens. But this is not a book for teens only. Many adults (including my book club) have read and liked the book.

There are 46 other reviews at http://www.amazon.com/Talent-B-Lynn-Goodwin/dp/1629293350/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450916910&sr=8-1&keywords=9781629293356. Sandee Mason and I hope you will add yours soon. 

This summer is a perfect time to read TALENT. If you are a teen, encourage your teacher to have the whole class read it. If you are a parent, share it with your kids. Read it together. Discussion questions in the back will help you get conversations going… in case that has ever been a problem in your life.

Please write back and tell me what you think of the book. I can’t wait to hear from you.

10 People/Groups to Share TALENT With

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TALENT on Amazon

Have you read TALENT? Well, why not? It’s only a click away. Go to the Talent on Amazon link above.

Want to know what to do with it after you read it? I should tell you to buy a copy for everyone you know, but between you and me, you can pass yours along if you want to.

  • Give a copy to a teacher. What kind of teacher? A drama teacher, an English teacher, a teacher who loves kids. Give it to an art teacher, or a photography teacher. Any teacher.
  • Give it to a librarian. School and youth librarians are looking for teen-centered books. Some of them get tired of vampires, shape shifters, and those who live in a dystopian society. You’ll be giving the gift of contemporary fiction.
  • Give it to your favorite student—especially one grades 6-11. It’s really suitable for anyone above a fourth grade reading level. Some of its themes are universal while its scenes are immediate and real. Although the heroine is a girl, there are two strong male characters, Rob and Diego.
  • Give it to the parents of any teen or tween. It will help them to see themselves through teen eyes.
  • Give it to a bookseller. It’s the perfect non-dystopian addition to the YA shelves.
  • Give it to a church’s youth group leader. It’s worth reading and sharing. There are discussion questions in the back.
  • Give it to a Girl Scout leader. Sandee is a role model for girls who empower themselves.
  • Give it to the thespians and former thespians in your life. It will bring back memories.
  • Give it to sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, and grandkids when they are in a show—whether it’s musical comedy, a concert, or even a Power Point presentation. Show them you understand what they’re going through and so does Sandee.
  • Give a copy to the juvenile hall library in your county. They need books that include positive role models.

Who have I forgotten? Write back and tell me who else needs a copy. There should be a contact button at the top.

Caliburn Press Blog Hop

Talent Paperback – November 1, 2015 by B. Lynn Goodwin (Author) 4.7 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews

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TALENT Celebrates With Others

tumblr_lkyllvIjRZ1qhnqczToday I have the privilege of being on the Caliburn Press Blog Hop, coordinated by The Vampire Queen, http://www.thevampirequeen1.blogspot.com.

Caliburn Press, https://sites.google.com/site/caliburnpressllc/, deals mostly with horror, the supernatural, and the paranormal, and there may be a bit of paranormal or supernatural phenomenon in TALENT.

There is, but Sandee isn’t sure about whether the supernatural is real or a trick—maybe done with mirrors or an imaginative medium. In her mind, maybe it’s real and maybe it’s not. I know the psychic she consults is real and knows her stuff.

Caliburn Press also publishes young adult romance. Fifteen-and-a-half-year-old Sandee Mason qualifies as a young adult. She’s mature one minute and child-like the next. She’s discovering romance, or maybe it’s finding her while she’s busy trying to find her talents.

Sandee is going to put up a post quoting from some of the reviews for her story, but first, Continue reading

Permission Slips

What would you add?

Telling HerStories: The Broad View

by Jude Walsh Whelley

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Every Sunday I meet with my tribe of four women writers for a morning of what Eric Maisel calls Deep Writing. It is a lovely, centering time where we sit side-by-side and write. During occasional breaks we share information on craft, submission, and building platform. The shared writing energy keeps us focused and productive. On my drive home, as I process what I wrote and what we shared, I am frequently inspired. At those moments, I use the voice memo function on my phone to record my thoughts. I may listen to that voice memo and tranfer it to written form immediately or, if life grabs me when I get home, the memo may sit for a while.

In a recent burst of decluttering energy, I decided to review those waiting memos. I found this gem and want to share. I was looking for ways to…

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