One of the Big Ones

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The San Jose Mercury News is one of the big regional newspapers in California. I remember reading it when I was a little girl, before the term Silicon Valley was coined, back in the day when we had one TV with no remote, in a console, in the family room. The Mercury-News has endured, and I hope that TALENT, which was reviewed there last week, will also endure.

This review, by Joanna Kraus, appeared in a column entitled “Summer Reading is Fun for All.” Here is what she said:

“Talent” by B. Lynn Goodwin (Danville) (Eternal Press, $12.50, ages 13-16.) Sandee’s brother has been missing in Afghanistan for seven months. Yet she hears Bri’s voice encouraging her when she auditions for the school musical, advising her when she selects a possible boyfriend, and supporting her when she must disobey the law to rescue a friend. She discovers “real life doesn’t have a script” in this moving novel, set in the East Bay. Sandee shows initiative, responsibility and finally the will to live her own life.

I liked her accuracy, her originality, and her choices of what will appeal to teens. But this is not a book for teens only. Many adults (including my book club) have read and liked the book.

There are 46 other reviews at http://www.amazon.com/Talent-B-Lynn-Goodwin/dp/1629293350/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1450916910&sr=8-1&keywords=9781629293356. Sandee Mason and I hope you will add yours soon. 

This summer is a perfect time to read TALENT. If you are a teen, encourage your teacher to have the whole class read it. If you are a parent, share it with your kids. Read it together. Discussion questions in the back will help you get conversations going… in case that has ever been a problem in your life.

Please write back and tell me what you think of the book. I can’t wait to hear from you.

10 People/Groups to Share TALENT With

Goodwin

TALENT on Amazon

Have you read TALENT? Well, why not? It’s only a click away. Go to the Talent on Amazon link above.

Want to know what to do with it after you read it? I should tell you to buy a copy for everyone you know, but between you and me, you can pass yours along if you want to.

  • Give a copy to a teacher. What kind of teacher? A drama teacher, an English teacher, a teacher who loves kids. Give it to an art teacher, or a photography teacher. Any teacher.
  • Give it to a librarian. School and youth librarians are looking for teen-centered books. Some of them get tired of vampires, shape shifters, and those who live in a dystopian society. You’ll be giving the gift of contemporary fiction.
  • Give it to your favorite student—especially one grades 6-11. It’s really suitable for anyone above a fourth grade reading level. Some of its themes are universal while its scenes are immediate and real. Although the heroine is a girl, there are two strong male characters, Rob and Diego.
  • Give it to the parents of any teen or tween. It will help them to see themselves through teen eyes.
  • Give it to a bookseller. It’s the perfect non-dystopian addition to the YA shelves.
  • Give it to a church’s youth group leader. It’s worth reading and sharing. There are discussion questions in the back.
  • Give it to a Girl Scout leader. Sandee is a role model for girls who empower themselves.
  • Give it to the thespians and former thespians in your life. It will bring back memories.
  • Give it to sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, and grandkids when they are in a show—whether it’s musical comedy, a concert, or even a Power Point presentation. Show them you understand what they’re going through and so does Sandee.
  • Give a copy to the juvenile hall library in your county. They need books that include positive role models.

Who have I forgotten? Write back and tell me who else needs a copy. There should be a contact button at the top.

Caliburn Press Blog Hop

Talent Paperback – November 1, 2015 by B. Lynn Goodwin (Author) 4.7 out of 5 stars 43 customer reviews

Talent

TALENT Celebrates With Others

tumblr_lkyllvIjRZ1qhnqczToday I have the privilege of being on the Caliburn Press Blog Hop, coordinated by The Vampire Queen, http://www.thevampirequeen1.blogspot.com.

Caliburn Press, https://sites.google.com/site/caliburnpressllc/, deals mostly with horror, the supernatural, and the paranormal, and there may be a bit of paranormal or supernatural phenomenon in TALENT.

There is, but Sandee isn’t sure about whether the supernatural is real or a trick—maybe done with mirrors or an imaginative medium. In her mind, maybe it’s real and maybe it’s not. I know the psychic she consults is real and knows her stuff.

Caliburn Press also publishes young adult romance. Fifteen-and-a-half-year-old Sandee Mason qualifies as a young adult. She’s mature one minute and child-like the next. She’s discovering romance, or maybe it’s finding her while she’s busy trying to find her talents.

Sandee is going to put up a post quoting from some of the reviews for her story, but first, Continue reading

Permission Slips

What would you add?

Telling HerStories: The Broad View

by Jude Walsh Whelley

permissionJude

Every Sunday I meet with my tribe of four women writers for a morning of what Eric Maisel calls Deep Writing. It is a lovely, centering time where we sit side-by-side and write. During occasional breaks we share information on craft, submission, and building platform. The shared writing energy keeps us focused and productive. On my drive home, as I process what I wrote and what we shared, I am frequently inspired. At those moments, I use the voice memo function on my phone to record my thoughts. I may listen to that voice memo and tranfer it to written form immediately or, if life grabs me when I get home, the memo may sit for a while.

In a recent burst of decluttering energy, I decided to review those waiting memos. I found this gem and want to share. I was looking for ways to…

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April 4 – Talent

Here’s another version of the opening chapter of Writer Advice. Want to support Sandee and her author? Visit the site and encourage people to read the whole story.

One Woman's Day

by B. Lynn Goodwin

Chapter One

This is the day that could change my life.

I’ve been living in the shadow of my big brother, Brian Mason, all of my life, but in five more minutes, I’m going to audition for San Ramos High’s spring production of Oklahoma! I’m reading for Ado Annie, who sings and dances and flirts, but if I don’t get it, maybe I can play Gertie or Ellen or somebody else with lines.

Across the room, the ugly Senior Sofa is crammed with drama’s elite in skinny jeans and faux fur jackets. They’re hoping for leads too, and they’re seniors. Where does that leave a sophomore like me? I slide my hand into my backpack and pull out two red M&Ms. The chocolate melts on my tongue and soothes my stomach.

Jenn McCall, the best singer in the sophomore class, slips in next to me, drops…

View original post 330 more words